SUMMARY OF THE EXCERPT FROM STEPHEN KING, ON INSPIRING WRITERS (AS FOUND IN THE BOOK “WRITING IN THE WORKS”)

Literacy narrative is a common form of autobiography in conveying the origins of literacy for a particular individual (Blau and Burak, 2013, p. 42-43). In this blog post, I will summarize the content found in an excerpt highlighted in the book Writing in the Works 6th ed., a course book for the course Communication, Culture, and information technology 110 (also known as CCT110) at the University of Toronto in Mississauga (Blau and Burak, 2013, p. 42-43). In the excerpt readers are introduced to Stephen King, the prolific writer, and his upbringing with writing (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p. 42-43). King presents a literacy narrative in the excerpt from his memoir On Writing (King, 2000); the excerpt is a reflection on his childhood and the start of his writing (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). Encouraged by his mother, and overjoyed by the effect of his initial attempts at writing on her, King is forever impacted (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). King’s mother’s influence sparks his initial curiosity and the continuing endeavour he makes in a field he now holds as a career—writing.

There is one bias that I’d like to focus on that can be found in the excerpt from King (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). This bias is the focus King has in his writing (Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). His excerpt indicates a tone and subject that would be relevant almost exclusively for aspiring writers (because of his tone and the topics of interest he includes in his memoir—i.e. his childhood and his attempts and successes or influences with writing) (Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). However, his writing (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43) can still be relevant to people aspiring for any other career because it may show some insight into how inspiration or passion for one’s work begins, in this case in childhood.

The major strong point of King’s literacy narrative is that it is a vivid recollection of King’s past (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). This is informative because it provides commentary on the context of the influences in his childhood that pushed him into the foray of writing (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). This (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43) is definitely something that would be useful to any aspiring writer.

There are no significant cons that I found or that I consider as significant flaws within the excerpt (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43).

The excerpt from King’s memoir is very well done because it shows how a child’s initial spark can lead to an inevitable or eventual career or life satisfaction in a particular field or work (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). The excerpt is very insightful, especially since it is from a prolific writer and not someone who is anonymous (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43). This is much more influential for aspiring writers; and if this is the case that the excerpt had the intention of inspiring writers, then it can be considered to a very good attempt (Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43).

In the end, I would say this excerpt was something any individual can learn from, and maybe take to heart to influence them in their own career or life path (as cited in Blau and Burak, 2013, p.42-43).

Reference List

Blau, Susan, & Burak, Kathryn (2013). Writing in the Works (3rd ed.). Boston, MA:                   Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

King, Stephen (2000). On Writing: A memoir of the Craft. New York: Pocket Books, a division        of Simon & Schuster, Inc.